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ROADR: The New Roadside Assistance App with the Ribeiro Brothers

Join Tim in this fascinating conversation with Celso Ribiero and Otiniel Ribiero of RoadR, a new roadside assistance app. Founder & CEO Otiniel, has 10 years of experience in technology. A strong believer in the power of positive thinking in the workplace, synergy, and solution-driven problem solving. Otiniel’s background in Tech extends as far back as childhood, where he used to take computers apart, repair, and build them. In Angola, as early as 14 years of age, he would sell ever ything he got his hands on: games, cellphones, computer parts, you name it. In the United States, as an adult, he built and sold cryptocurrency mining rigs for several businesses, gaming computers to NBA athletes, celebrities, etc.




Co-Founder & CIO Celso, is responsible for managing the innovation process inside the company that identifies strategies, business opportunities, and new technologies. Which leads to the development of new capabilities and architectures with partners, new business models and new industry structures to serve those opportunities.

Moreover, he has 10+ years of experience as a graphic designer. His design portfolio includes works such as Roadr ’s Pitch Deck, user and specialist apps, letterhead, One Pager, just to name a few.

Celso holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics with a minor in Physics from Texas Tech University. Connect with ROADR: https://roadr.com/ Roadr - Apps on Google Play Roadr on the App Store (apple.com)





Full Transcript:

Hello, and welcome to another edition of Podcast for the Future. I'm your host, Tim Chrisman, the executive Director of the Foundation for the Future. I'm joined today by two of the founders of a startup called ROADR the brothers Otiniel & Celso Ribeiro. They come originally from Angola come to the US by way of Norway. Otiniel is the founder and CEO of ROADR with 10 years of experience in technology companies. He is. Constantly looking for new ways to innovate and has a particular bent towards trying to improve computer hardware. As early as 14, he started his sales career.


According to him, he would sell anything his hands could he could get his hands on. So it'll it'll be exciting to hear more about that. Celso is the chief Innovation Officer. Where he leads the development of new capabilities and architectures for ROADR. He has over 10 years experience as a graphic designer doing design and technology development and holds a bachelor of science in mathematics from Texas Tech University.


It's it's exciting to have you both here and yeah, let's chat.  Hello, Tim.


 Hello, and if I remember right, it's gonna be you and your brother, right?


. Okay. Very good. Hi everyone. Hello. Yeah, no, great having you here. The whole idea is just trying to get a sense of, what got you here and making the case that people doing things that are.


Important and a big deal. Don't always follow a linear path.




Yes. Yeah, of course. No, cause the, Our listeners want to hear is that they have a shot at doing something. Exactly. They're sitting in an office, have been doing that for 30 years, or they got an art history degree and don't know what they're gonna do with it. And they have a shot to do something given some determination, some grit and audacity.


Yep. Yeah. So yeah, let's Yeah, no. Tell me about your backgrounds. I'm assuming you all have worked out who gets to talk first by some sibling hand signal that I haven't been able to pick up on . Yeah. I can get a head start. Background. So we were originally born in Angola, Central Africa.


Then so transition to Portugal where I attended elementary school. So we're pretty much back and forth between Angola and Portugal, cuz Angola were a Portuguese colony in the past. Okay. And then, so we're, our entire life we were in a Portuguese education system. And then funny enough, we end up in Norway where we didn't know any English nor in region.


I was in the middle of high school. Yeah. And Celso in, in the middle school. And we always had the passion towards technology because our parents, my mother, she's a chemical engineer. My father is a politician and also an engineer with minors in computer science. So we got in trouble a couple of times.


He had this old IBM computers at home, so we would take parts and he would've come home and the computer's not working and he has to get his work done. And it just started fast forward, he in depth, like giving us one of the old computers that was just sitting in there. And just out of curiosity, all we wanted to do was play games and Yeah.


And you just have fun. And I will never forget it was the FIFA. It came out and our GPU could run it. It wasn't strong enough. Oh, no. So we asked him, so we asked him for, for funds to buy it, and he told us no. And so we ended up getting copies of that game and we started selling in, in, I was in middle school and Celso wasn't in elementary.


So we're starting to spread, which is illegal by the way, that were all prior copies. But that's basically where everything started, so yeah, I'll let Celso continue a little bit on, on that background side but yeah, that's pretty much where our entrepreneur journey started for the most.


Hey, you gotta do what you gotta do. If your computer doesn't work for the game you want as a kid, I, I've a hundred percent backed your play on this man . I can there was so many times when growing up I had one thing or another where I wanted to play man and conquer. I think it.


And computer wouldn't handle it. That for a five year old, that's a significant emotional event. Yeah. . If you gotta turn to a life of crime, you gotta do that. Sometimes. I get it. You gotta and the lesson there, being able to be okay with uncomfortable, be exactly.


Gotta be able to move in the room full of nos, like Kanye sex, and that's what got us here. It was many nos to get here. Yep. Here we are. Yeah. But yeah, also, yeah. Cause this journey, it really started that way and it only kept growing and growing. So after that, when we went to, Nor. We are both like very active, so we were athletes as well.


So we ended up taking on basketball and I was one of the star athletes on the team, not to do my own horn, but we started developing, like being around that culture. I think the sports culture being around having your teammate, that camaraderie with your coach. Yeah, it just opens up your eyes a lot. Yeah, it really does.


With teammates and with other people too, to, for a common go, and this is way, I think our social skills took another leap, so being able to get people to buy into the vision of what you guys are trying to do. In that case, was winning a championship for the first time, for the school, specific school, but that mentality.


Carried us to, brought us to the us. Actually, the reason why we came to the US Oh was specifically me, it was mostly for, cause I wanted to be in the nba. That was my goal. There was nothing else. It was either that I was gonna be an entrepreneur. I even remember saying that. Yeah in 11th grade, And everybody looked at me like back home in Angola.


They're like, What you going wear here in Africa? Hell, I don't see that happen anytime soon. So yeah, but that was always my vision. And ot, same thing. And my younger brother too, he's also one of the cofounders lu Kenny. So the household, just imagine three, almost very competi. Yeah, my mom used to poke competition somewhere or another, and then when we came here to the us, that's where we got into crypto.


Thousand 14, 15, we started really building mining rigs and selling to business. Like on the B2B side? Yeah. Yeah. We wanted to start their own mining farms and stuff, and that's where it all happened in. So the car breaks down in one of the a very dangerous neighborhood there, and we had to wait for two, three hours.


Wow. Fil-A And that experience leaves a better test in your mouth. Cause not only is it expensive , you have to pay, but the time commit. How stressful you are in this situation. And then you can't leave because you wanna make sure that the person who is coming to help you and everything is somebody that is trustworthy.


So you have all of those things going on. Yeah, And what spark it. Cause we were always like sales, right? Selling stuff, selling, selling cd, selling games, selling mining rigs. You know what, there's a need for, let's research this company this industry better. And we started research.


And from then on actually talking with people. Yeah. Everybody had that similar experience. I'm like, how? How is this, So this is almost like the food. Everybody gets to put some point in life and they're like, Wow, this is insane. And then finally talking to the professionals, that's what really sold it. Oh, yeah.


Because they are exploited in this industry to some degree. Oh wow. It's like the, It's a very dangerous job. Lots of them like, One every six days. Every six days dies on the job because of oncoming traffic and stuff on the freeway. Ok. It's very dangerous. And to not be compensated enough. Yeah. Not having the autonomy of your own body and everything, and you're not being able to take like more than two weeks of absence maybe.


Yeah. Or even your vacation time is only like two weeks. Most of the. Wow. I was like learning these stories and interacting with them and talking with them. It sold the whole picture and it was like, Yeah, this is a must. We need to do this. So yeah, they decided to create roller. Wow. No my AAA experience was also in Texas.


What part? Texas so it was West Texas somewhere between Lubbock and El Paso. I don't know exactly. I'm actually a. Railroad. I'm a Texas, okay. . Yeah. Yeah. I was driving from Georgia to Arizona. It was in one go. I was trying to get on a plane from Phoenix home for Christmas, and ran outta gas in the middle of the night.


Yep. . It happens. . But how did you wait? It was hours. Wow. Which gave me a good chance to nap. All things considered it probably made my trip safer, but not a good thing. And so yeah, no, it's definitely a need and it's finally here, know? yeah. , C is the pilot and to then go nationwide and then international.


Yeah, no, absolutely. Yeah, go ahead. And what, you guys had this experience , and you did this research and then Mo, most people stop there. , they have this, most people stop it's bad experience and say hey, this sex, why did this happen?


You all went the next step further and was like, Hey, how common is this? This is kinda weird. . And then you went even further and said we can fix this. , like what was the thought process there? I think ourselves, just in life where there's a challenge, there's an opportunity and then it just started from there.


Yeah. We believe in taking one day at a time. And this is exactly what we did. So by ultimately what we did is a team sport. Yeah. Because as human beings, we are all born not perfect. So the sum of imperfection makes it perfect. So together we were able to build something that not only helps people, but solves a problem and generate many jobs.


During the beginning we wanted to we wanted to see, okay, what are the things that we are able and capable of doing right now? , start on the legal side through name, registering everything. And then on the design aspect of it, there's something there. We have an eye for it.


We're extremely detailed. Me soso, and a lot of our team members, And then it started from there was right in the middle of the covid. Everything was dead. So we had a small office in Houston. We relocated from Houston to LA taking mine. Now this is, nothing is open, okay? This is the perfect city to launch this, and the market is great.


It's the perfect fit. And then California is the tech of, of the United States. I was like, Okay, let's do it. So we made the trip here and start taking one day at a time, talking directly with the customers, gathering feedback. Initially it was just the customer, talking to them and so on, cuz we knew a little bit of the pain points because we through it ourselves and then to now getting on the specialist side.


So with saying, we literally go and we have coffee with. We interact with them directly. Because the goal is to build something that addresses the customer and the specialist side, right? So that they both happy. And that's how you win. So there are many answers that they have been trying to get from the big players in the industry, and we are here to address them.


So we are placing. Everything within our product. Yeah. And yeah yeah. Yeah. It's, that's basically what it what, how everything just played out by just taking one day at a time and being patient being comfortable with uncomfortable, like we're saying it would be plenty of No, but the last thing you wanna do is giving up, right?


So the grit, like you mention, and just being, being self motivated, being able to clap, self clap whenever there's a small accomplishment and now it's here so the world will be able to use it and we'll definitely impact many lives in a positive manner. And that was the entire goal since we started.


Yeah. Yeah. And I a lot of people, Especially, the people that come on here and talk or that, you or I hang out with, don't necessarily recognize the significance of what you were saying there about, Oh we just kept going. , yeah. A thousand people told me no yesterday or there was a dozen technical problems, but I just kept going.


It doesn't seem like a big deal. And every single one of those on their own probably aren't. But then, you celebrated every one of these little wins. You picked yourself up after every one of the little no's and right now, six months, a year, two years later. , it's it's a big deal.


It turns out . Thank you. And it makes sense if you actually notice, like this is why I mentioned the background with with sports and basketball. Like we weren't when you started sports. It's very rarely, unless you are like extremely gifted. Yeah, genetically. And maybe you have started training since we're like four years old, maybe


Yeah. Yeah. But most of us, once we picked up like at maybe around 11, 12 years old, you're not really good. You're the worst player on the team. You suck. You either going to let that experience hinder. Or you're gonna let it build you up. Yeah. So that's where the grid comes from.


This is what I'm saying. The background in basketball is very important because I always believe people need to go to struggle, especially men specifically. Yeah. We need to go to struggle because we need to be able to overcome and solve problems. This is our main agency. Yeah. Yeah. That's where it comes from losing in our home floor, especially playing basketball, being trash.


And coming the next year on the bus, coming back from Sweden back to Norway, they're like, Guys, we need to win the next tournament in our own gym, in our own school. We need to win it. We cannot accept this anymore. And that working together, like what you said, the team aspect, working together figuring it out, Okay, you're better at this.


I think you should do this next season. We need to change the office maybe this way. And all of these. It might seem like it only applies to sport, but it applies to business and life in general. Yeah, and all the adversities that we had to face, I felt in school. like in 11th grade, I got held back twice.


Like it was devastating. Literally when you went to cu I was about to come to the US but I felt twice and all of my friends already graduated there living the college life and everything, and I'm stuck there back home knowing that this, that day I made a promise to myself. I was like, Every time I fail at something, I will never give up.


Especially if I know that there's a way to improve Little by little. Eventually you, every like a thousand miles you can walk, but it just takes one step by the time. Yep, that's true. So taking one step and we got here to the us graduated built rotor, knows some top of nose from BC , but you get this one.


The family and friends, you get your angel invest. Couple visits that believe in you. That's all you need. You just need one. Yes, that's true. Then the rest is history. Yep. And all you had to do is keep walking. . Yeah. That's the only ways forward. Especially imagine if your back is against the wall.


You can move, you can go anywhere. already against the wall. It's true. All one way. It's forward. That's it. Yep. Keep going. No. No. I think it's incredible in hearing these stories. It's, every one of 'em starts in a different place. , but they all end in the same place, which is no, we just kept going.


, just kept going. And we figured it out. And most of the innovation that came out of it was an accident. We didn't set out to make all of these different things. And I'm sure that's a similar story with rotor where most of the IP and the work you've developed, you did cuz you had to not because you thought, Oh, we should make this like Exactly. , it becomes organic because you start having to be creative, I think outside the box all the time, especially when you don't have the fines right away. Yeah. Every decision is crucial from who is going to do this. How long do we have to finish this aspect of the app and everything.


Everything is like, who should we bring on board? , it's just. And you started it. So as you two your brother what was that like, bringing more people on? What, how did that go? , I guess It just, it all started I was part of the new chip accelerator program. Okay. And a lot of relations to a new chip.


Having meetings, events, postals and mentors. LinkedIn For sure. And just surrounding ourselves for like-minded individuals. Yeah, and This is key. This is key here, because if you don't do that, you'll waste a lot of time because it's imagine if you are listening to your radio station 96.5 and you put on 96.4, for instance, and there's a lot of noise in the background.


You can't even hear the music. Yeah. So we have to surround. With like-minded individuals, they sync so that way you can hear, the music clearly. Yeah. This is exactly what we did. So we had guys that were initially on the team that it just didn't fit the culture. Sure. And it wasn't just the right pit for us.


And organically as we kept going and learning more understanding the business side start. Operating and engaging with guys in the industry from advisors. So we were able to get our cto, which gave us a huge boost. We were able to bring in our marketing eye, which was one of the latest pick up that we had that joined the team.


Yeah, it took us to a whole nother level as far as the branding aspect and so on. And yeah, all the components, they all play a vital. In the company. Yeah. Yeah. It starts with a strong team. You have to have a strong team because if not, you are not going to be able to not only just launch and then scale, . Yeah. It's very important. Yeah. No and as alluded to selecting the team even, Selecting people out can be as important as who you bring up. It's like a marriage. It's like a. Yeah. Which is, in one way a nice way to start a business is with, siblings, you're stuck with your siblings, Absolutely. We compliment each other, so I know exactly. And this started early on, throughout childhood, know's c . Yeah. So I'm I'm selling the games. He's getting a percentage as well on everything that he's selling. And now here we are, we have this product.


That is going to impact so many different lives. And by it all started somewhere right. And understanding each other. So we've been in sync. He knows my weaknesses, I know his weaknesses and vice versa, even our brother Lu Kenny. Yeah. He has his friends as well and the vice versa.


It just goes like But yeah, no, that's one of the most important lessons. Yeah. I always think that people. Is one thing. First of all, we don't know everything. It doesn't matter what industry, how long you've been in the industry. Yeah. , you have to be, you have to have intellectual humility.


Know that you dunno everything. And most importantly, don't be afraid to admit that you're wrong. Yeah. Yeah. The matter of fact, the only reason why we're here is because. I humble enough to admit that we failed here and here, and we need to take accountability for that and correct it.


And if we can't fix it ourselves, we need to bring somebody that can fix on the team. Yeah, that's literally what changed. What I think this is one of our biggest advantages. We have self aware enough to understand, like he said, our weaknesses, the rest of our team members weaknesses, and we surround with people ourselves, with people like that.


Everybody on the team is exactly that. It doesn't matter how great they are, what they do, they all have the same mentality. So we always complement each other and we always bring more people to round out the team to make sure that we have a full vision of what we're doing, not just a myopic vision.


So that is the number one thing to me, admitting that you're wrong because you'll make a lot of mistakes in correcting if you can, or bringing somebody that can. Yeah, no I still remember you. Realizing that it was more important to show, when I'm interviewing for a job or when I'm talking to an investor to show what I failed at.


and why I'm not that person anymore. , like that went against everything I was taught as a your learn. Maybe I was not taught, learned as a kid where it's no, you show 'em what you're good at, always show 'em the best parts. But. No, you're exactly right. Show up to an investor, show up to a job interview and tell 'em, Look, here's all the ways I messed up and here's all the things I learned from 'em.


I'm not gonna make those mistakes again. , I'm gonna make some other ones guaranteed. But, I'm pretty good at learning from the times I mess up . Exactly. Yeah. And you mentioned, you guys. Willing to admit when you don't know something. And I think, we see this in a lot of different industries that people who have been in there for a long time just assume they know how it's supposed to work.


Everything works this way. This is how it always will work. And it's people who come in from the outside who are like, Why? I don't understand why it works this way. Why do you have to, do X, Y, and Z that are able to actually see change? And I'm willing to bet that's a big reason why you guys have the traction you do.


. Yeah. Very true. Organically as humans, we were all born seekers. We want answers and so on, and it kills me when, for instance, one of the issues with a lot of entrepreneurs is not being able to do that as for help. Yeah. Yeah. They can figure out everything themselves. Yep. Which is completely wrong.


You were spend countless hours trying to learn. Yeah. You can learn those skills, which is great, but let's say for instance, marketing, right? Let's say there's someone that's been doing this for 20 plus. It's so much better. Instead of hiring outsourcing the marketing and bringing someone in that you can learn from practically on a day to day basis.


Start from point A to point B and learn every step of the way. You learn so much. I learn, I'm learning so much towards marketing now. I'm learning so much applying with the service providers. Yeah. By talking directly with. Why? Because I cannot find all the answers from Google. Yeah. Industry's completely different.


It's not yeah. Systematics, you'll be able to get a lot of data and so on. No, you'll buy all. We bought so many different reports, but there's just crucial and missing points that only the guy that is there on a day to day basis on a job can give you those answers. Yeah. Yeah. What we're. And that's what social we're just touching on as well, being able to know that we just don't know it all.


And it, and then from there, you are able to pretty much achieve anything. Yeah. No, I think that's, that's well said, . It's Weird, once you realize that and are able to actually start living it. And being comfortable in that is, is a huge differentiator. Especially in startups, we're we've talked around a little bit of, rotor and how the story behind it, and so people can probably guess, but what exactly is rotor? Yeah, so basically rotor, quoting New York Weekly here is the Uber for assistant Uber of roadside assistant. So basically the approach came from the mindset.


On the customer side, right? On the drivers, Yeah. We usually get stranded and we never know when that's gonna happen, right? So when that happens, you need somebody who can come with certified, who can come to help you, but at the same time, you have the control in your hands, not the opposite way. You have to ask for help, and then your insurance providers or whoever.


It's going to control the logistics and you just stay at the mercy waiting to see what's gonna happen. Yep. Yep. Putting the power back in your head, which we call like safety in your hands, you'll be able to decide all of those factors for before you accept the service, right? Yeah. Over the service.


And the same goes for the other side. So the spec, this is where it becomes the Uber so the specialist can use his skill set. Yeah. Like I said, this is a dangerous. Oh yeah. You put your life on the line every time you are on the freeway with the traffic at 70 miles per hour plus. So you really have to be careful with if you're not in like position where people can see you and stuff like that.


So they wanted the autonomy back. This is the one thing that industry has failed to realize They're trying to keep them constrained in like their employees and contractors. Like we have to work on a schedule and have a big salary and stuff like, When they are seeing all other industries being disrupted.


We have Uber now taxi drivers, and everybody can now monetize that gig. Economies in full effect. And everybody from influencers, everybody wants their own platform, wants to do things their way to some degree. Yeah. So it's a natural fit. So we bring both needs and that's what we are providing. So basically we are providing, like for this, Five services with charging, doing the next one coming soon, which is towing.


Tire change, do lock gas per fuel and also jam. Those are the services that the service providers will be providing, and it gives the customer the, and this is also a key differentiator. Not only do you have this on the men's side and on the emergency side. Yeah. But you can also schedule this.


Oh, so if you have a flat tire that you know, or maybe you went out of town and you're coming back and you need somebody to jump your battery. Yeah. You can schedule that ahead of time and have somebody two days. The moment you travel from, I don't know from Vegas back to LA Yeah.


To help you with that so you can schedule those services too. So it gives them more of a. More volume. Yeah. Also work with, because just working on the man's side, you're not gonna have as many requests every day. It's not consistent. You can really business that way. So now we're bringing, we're unlocking the other demands that was not tapped, and we're trying to bring all this other services to compliment that.


Okay. Okay. And I'm, all the times I've used roadside assistance. , it's always been my insurance provider has paid for it. So are you all then coordinating with insurance companies to try to be a provider for them? Yeah. That's a great, that's a great question. The goal is initially as we go to the market now on the B2C side, it will be just like Soso was saying like Uber.


So you can, yeah, you wanna go as you need service, but also we'll offer a yearly me. You can pay $9 a month or a hundred dollars a year, and you get up to two services initially. And then our goal is to increase those as well. Yeah. Gain much more traction and be able to provide perks and so on to our community and users.


But here's the catch from the B2B side. Our technology can be also used by service providers, like in just insurance company. Who's your insurance? S A S A A. So let's just say for S A and Rotor, we have a partnership. They can easily wide label technology. Yep. And licensing fee. So whenever now you go on a rotor app, all you have to do is type in your policy number.


And s A gets notified whenever any services requested by you and they take care of all the billing for you so you don't have to pay anything out of pocket and so on. Think of rotor day operating almost like PayPal for e-commerce. Yeah. Yeah. You go to multiple stores, you shop online, but then when it's time to pay, you check out PayPal.


So we operate that way on the b2b. Okay. No that's cool. Yeah, . Yeah. And you guys said you're launching in Los Angeles or have launched? Here it's available. And you should download, by the way. Yeah. Even though you're not here in Los Angeles, but you can download and the goal is we are looking to analytics and base on demand.


So we'll start targeting other major cities in. So let's say if you're in Chicago, for instance, and we see a huge demand in Chicago, we're like, Oh, it's looking pretty good here. Let's deploy and make it available in Chicago. No that's good to know. So our listeners, wherever they're at, download the app on Apple Store and Google Android.


. And then based on where where we're downloading or where we're creating accounts, no, you can download it. You just won't have service providers at that particular location. So in la but by gathering and just getting the demand that we need. So we'll be able to see peek and point, Okay, this is a right fit.


Think we should make the move to the city. And then, this is for you. This is giving the power back to the community. , it's the app built for the community and power by the community. So that's what we need. No, Yeah. No, and I love the idea that, if you want to have this in your town find 500 a year your closest Facebook friends and tell 'em all to download.


Is there, to that, and maybe there's not. By the way, App is free. Okay, that's good. What, is there a threshold for win? How many people in a city before you it's worth it to move in there. I think our threshold is around 2000. Okay. Okay. I think I can find 2000 people around DC Yeah, let's do We'll bring it to dc It's actually a great it's a good market as well. Yeah. Especially because everybody drives so crazy and so there's a constant need. Or some sort of service . Yeah. This is great. This is great. I love it. Love it. Yeah. No, and I think the most exciting part is, connecting this these kids who play basketball and.


Just didn't wanna be stuck in a bad neighborhood. Waiting for somebody to fix their car with. Right Now, solving that problem for other people. You didn't go to school for roadside assistance. You didn't, you don't have degrees in automotive. Technology. I don't think I, I only checked you two's degrees.


I didn't check your brothers . But like you saw a problem you're solving it. And I think that's an exciting exciting story. Thank you. It means a lot. It means a lot to. Finally the lights at end. The . Exactly. And that's the thing. So yeah you raised a precede. You've got a solid team.


You're launch, you're launched in la what's the next six, 12 months look like? Yeah. Other than DC because I gotta get 2000 people, so you pencil that in. But one of the cities where it's just the worst too, between hassles and the nation. Of course we are already in California, so we'll take it also to San Francisco, but we are launching in Houston, in Dallas as well.


Okay. The worst cities too, between US Nation. . And then the goal from there is continuing to grow. In the next six months we open to, to work with, other players in the industry as well, like we were mentioning. We can providers. Yeah. They can, we can work together and improve the industry.


And yeah, it just, taking one day at a time and and being present even in this, and you have to be present. That's true. Because the past, it's a reference in the future simply. Yep. Expectations and many more. Yep. So our goal is to be present and focus on the things that we have right in front of us and improving them.


Yep. And taking one day at a time. And I think eventually when you do that, that's the key to ultimately happiness and. Are you able to achieve anything? It's true. It's true. Yeah. No, and I I know we're getting close on time here and is there anything we missed out? Cause otherwise that was a great place to end. 📍


The, actually that's everything. Just like you was just mentioning, just download the app and go. And Apple store. This is for you. It's for the people and it's following whatever you need, wherever you go, whenever you need any type of services, right? Your pocket and you don't have to wait for countless hours is here for you.


Let's improve and change this industry together. Applying also to the users and the service providers. Everyone that is listening right now, this is for you. Rotor is here and let's. Ready to roll. Cool. And we'll in we'll include the links. They'll be in the description here. . So you guys can click on 'em, download the app, check out their website.


And also the Instagram page. And the Instagram we post Daily, Pretty much twice a day. Yeah. And you get the insights on what's coming. Like we're gonna have a big announcement today actually, . Okay. You should name and the next and tomorrow too. Those two, There's two big announcements coming.


Okay. Sounds good. Yeah, we'll include a link there as well. Alrighty. It was a pleasure. It was a pleasure. It was a pleasure too. Thank you both for being here. Take care. You as well. You as well.



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